ECCWS Mini Tracks

The Mini Tracks for ECCWS

  • Cyber Security and Privacy for the Internet of Things and other Emerging Technologies
  • Modelling Nation-state Cyber-operations
  • Interdisciplinary Research in Cybersecurity
  • Security and Privacy challenges in Smart Infrastructure
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Cyber Security and Privacy for the Internet of Things and other Emerging Technologies

Mini-Track Chair:  Sangapu Venkata Appaji, KKR and KSR Institute of Technology and Sciences, India 

ECCWS 2020 Mini Track on Cyber Security and Privacy for the Internet of Things and other Emerging Technologies  

The purpose of this track is to bring together experts including academics and industrialists working in the field of cyber security research with interests in emerging technologies such as educational technologies, Internet of Things, Artificial intelligence, Smart environments, Block Chain, 5G Services, Cloud Computing and Robotics. The systems based on these technologies are considered as critical infrastructures and have seemingly captured human dependence completely. These technologies have attracted investors, academia and researchers equally and are expected to have a drastic global impact on human life and economy. This mini track is expected to attract field experts, academics and researchers to present and discuss ongoing research, latest developments, possible solutions and future challenges of cyber security and privacy in emerging technologies. 

Subjects of interest to this mini-track may include but are not limited to:

  • Cyber Laws, Policies, Cyber-attack predication, Risk Assessment and Impact Analysis In emerging technologies
  • Cyber security Strategies for networked Robotics and automation
  • Cloud Forensics Approaches to deal with cybercrimes
  • Awareness to deal with Cyber-attack and cyber warfare in fourth Generation Industry applications

Modelling Nation-state Cyber-operations

Mini-Track Chair: Brett van Niekerk & Trishana Ramluckan, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa  

ECCWS 2020 Mini Track on Modelling Nation-state Cyber-operations  

Cyber operations have been evolving since the Stuxnet infection of the Natanz nuclear facility became public. There has been reported outages of Ukrainian power grids due to cyber-attacks, a reported Israeli airstrike retaliating against a building housing Hamas cyber capability and US cyber-attacks against Iranian air-defence networks. The WannaCry and NotPetya malware were attributed to state-backed actors. It is clear that “coercive cyber capabilities are becoming a new instrument of state power, as countries seek to strengthen national security and exercise political influence. Military capabilities are being upgraded to monitor the constantly changing cyber domain and to launch, and to defend against, cyber attacks” (IISS, 2014). The World Economic Forum’s The Global Risks Report 2020 (WEF, 2020) lists cyber-attacks in the top 10 risks for both likelihood and impact. Despite this rapidly growing concerns over the use of cyber-operations, some challenges and questions still have not been resolved after 10 years of discussion, including accepted international legal frameworks and models of state behaviour in projecting and defending national power online. 

  • Models of national cyber-power
  • Mathematical and technical models of national cyber-operations and decision making
  • International law and legal frameworks applied to national cyber-security, cyber-warfare and cyber-espionage
  • International relations models applied to cyber security, cyber warfare and cyber espionage
  • Command and control and intelligence models for cyber-operations
  • Modelling of nation-state and state-sponsored threat actors
  • Case studies of international cyber-security incidents and cyber-attacks
  • Closing the gap between technical and policy perspectives

Interdisciplinary Research in Cybersecurity

Mini-Track Chair: Dr. Char Sample, ICF Inc. US, University of Warwick UK

The dynamic and interconnected nature of cyber security touches and influences many aspects of life.  This inter-relatedness suggests that other disciplines might influence, or even possibly impact, cyber events.  For example, geo-political events, environmental events, culture, psychology or economic disciplines may offer new and unique insights into how cyber events are viewed and understood.  This track is dedicated to crossing the traditional disciplines of academia and examining cyber events within the context of another academic discipline.

    • Decision science and cybersecurity
    • Natural disasters and cyber events
    • Conflict and cyber events
    • Environmental resources and cyber events
    • Financial events and cyber events
    • Cyber-Physical systems security
    • Complexity modeling in cybersecurity

Security and Privacy challenges in Smart Infrastructure

Mini-Track Chair: Dr.Shahzad Ahmed Memon, University of Sindh,Pakistan

  ECCWS 2021 Mini Track on Security and Privacy challenges in Smart Infrastructure  

The purpose of this track is to bring together the experts including academics, industrialists related to the cyber security research and practices on smart infrastructures such as smart cities, smart healthcare, smart transportations, smart surveillance and smart energy systems. The critical infrastructures migrating towards smart infrastructures by deploying IoT, artificial intelligence and next generation communication technologies.  These technologies attracted to investors, academia, and researchers equally and expected to have a drastic global impact on human life and economy. This mini track is expected to attract field experts, academicians and researchers to present/discuss ongoing research, latest developments, good security practices, possible solutions, and recommendations to manufacturer and decision makers and future challenges of cyber security and privacy in various smart infrastructures.

Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Security threats in Smart Transportation
  • Cyber security in maritime systems
  • Smart healthcare privacy and security risks
  • 5G security
  • Smart Surveillance, Safety and security
  • Emerging cyber security and privacy with artificial intelligence