ECCWS Mini Tracks

The Mini Tracks for ECCWS

      • Cyber-Psychological Warfare and Computational Propaganda
      • Interdisciplinary Research in Cybersecurity
      • Evolving Cyber Operations in International Relations: Legal and Technical Considerations
      • The Application of Block Chain in Protecting Critical Infrastructure
      • Big Data for Cybersecurity
      • Cyber Security and Privacy for the Internet of Things and other Emerging Technologies
      • Ethical, Social, and Legal Issues in Cyber Warfare and Cyber Security
Submit your Abstract to an Academic Conference

Cyber-Psychological Warfare and Computational Propaganda

Mini-Track Chair:  Julie Murphy, Technological University Dublin  

ECCWS 2020 Call for Papers on Cyber-Psychological Warfare and Computational Propaganda  

In today’s attention economy, technology providers are vying to retain people’s attention by refining techniques to engage people longer on applications and devices, whilst simultaneously accumulating information for detailed analysis. Digital footprints reflect our preferences, connections and patterns of behaviour making it easier for organisations, or threat actors, to formulate specific targeted campaigns. International news and media is awash with examples of disinformation and influence campaigns that impact democracy, organisations and individuals. These threats reflect the increase of techniques using technological mediums, platforms and design to influence behaviours and psychological states. Automation and propagation combined with established psychological techniques furnish a threat actor with a powerful weapon. History reflects the powerful effects of psychological warfare and propaganda. Traditional perimeter-based defences are not a viable defence against such tactics. Therefore this mini-track is a call to researchers and professionals from multiple disciplines to collate their skills, knowledge and perspectives to reflect this contemporary threat, and to build a network to progress research in this fascinating area.

Perspectives from the following are welcome but not limited to:

      • Psychology / cyberpsychology
      • Threat intelligence
      • Data analytics / Big data
      • Digital marketing
      • Information Warfare

Interdisciplinary Research in Cybersecurity

Mini-Track Chair: Dr. Char Sample, ICF Inc. US, University of Warwick UK  

ECCWS 2020 Mini Track call for papers on Interdisciplinary Research in Cybersecurity  

The dynamic and interconnected nature of cyber security touches and influences many aspects of life.  This inter-relatedness suggests that other disciplines might influence, or even possibly impact, cyber events.  For example, geo-political events, environmental events, culture, psychology or economic disciplines may offer new and unique insights into how cyber events are viewed and understood.  This track is dedicated to crossing the traditional disciplines of academia and examining cyber events within the context of another academic discipline.

      • Decision science and cybersecurity
      • Natural disasters and cyber events
      • Conflict and cyber events
      • Environmental resources and cyber events
      • Financial events and cyber events
      • Cyber-Physical systems security
      • Complexity modeling in cybersecurity


Evolving Cyber Operations in International Relations: Legal and Technical Considerations

Trishana Ramluckan
Brett van Niekerk

Mini-Track Chair:  Trishana Ramluckan & Brett van Niekerk, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa  

ECCWS 2020 Mini Track call for papers on Evolving Cyber Operations in International Relations: Legal and Technical Considerations  

“…coercive cyber capabilities are becoming a new instrument of state power, as countries seek to strengthen national security and exercise political influence. Military capabilities are being upgraded to monitor the constantly changing cyber domain and to launch, and to defend against, cyber attacks.” 

IISS (2014) Cyber operations have been evolving since the Stuxnet infection of the Natanz nuclear facility become public. In the last year, there has been a reported Israeli airstrike retaliating against a building housing Hamas cyber capability and US cyber attacks against Iranian air-defence networks. The WannaCry and NotPetya pandemics were attributed to nation-state actors. Despite this rapidly growing use of cyber operations, some challenges and questions still have not been resolved after 10 years of discussion.

      • Application of international law and international relations models to cyber security, cyber warfare and cyber espionage
      • Modelling of national cyber power and nation-state/state-sponsored threat actors
      • National and regional perspectives on foreign policies regarding cyber security, cyber warfare and cyber espionage
      • International collaboration and information sharing for cyber security
      • Case studies of international cyber security incidents
      • Closing the gap between technical and policy perspectives


The Application of Block Chain in Protecting Critical Infrastructure

Mini-Track Chair: Pardis Moslemzadeh Tehrani, Faculty of Law, University of Malaya  

ECCWS 2020 Mini Track call for papers on The Application of Block Chain in Protecting Critical Infrastructure  

A block chain is a data structure that is shared between and replicated among the members of a network. It is an append-only shared ledger of digitally signed and encrypted transactions replicated across a peer network of nodes. It is acclaimed as a technology that helps provide a robust level of cyber security and protection and offers multiple advantages over traditional cyber defence strategies. Digital technologies have transformed warfare enormously. Warfare involving states in the cyber realm is no longer science fiction as was assumed in the 1990s. States are increasingly seeing it as a dominant military theatre and have deployed substantial sources to develop new types of attacks and protection against them. Countering this threat will require the capability to protect and share data that is impervious to such adversarial actions. Critical infrastructures are among the main targets of cyber warfare using civilian computers and other devices. Hackers are relying more on normal devices, which are easier to penetrate due to having poor cyber security.

The advent of the block chain has made a huge difference in the cyber security domain as it secures stored data and transfers it through a decentralized, trustworthy, and peer-to-peer system as well as simultaneously offering defensive and offensive results. There are various reasons why the block chain has become a tool for use in cyber warfare. First, it anonymous features make it difficult to establish the identity and location of cyber-attacks. This will significantly transform hybrid warfare in the 21st century as it lowers the detection process. Second, the attribution issues linked to anonymity make it an interesting option for social-media wars to be turned into a new battlefield. The fake identity of the warriors attacking cyber infrastructure can lead to complicated kinetic responses by the targeted country. The high level of security offered by block chains has revolutionized cyber warfare by allowing the sharing of data among multiple users while protecting them from the most common types of cyber-attack. It enables the monitoring of every digital asset that needs protection while the configurations of each component within the system can be imaged, hashed, secured in the database, and continually monitored. Any kind of change can be detected instantly.

Subjects of interest to this mini-track may include but are not limited to:

      • Cyber warfare and blockchain
      • Blockchain and cyber security
      • Protection of critical infrastructure via block chain
      • Policy and regulatory framework in the application of block chain to cyber warfare

Big Data for Cybersecurity

Mini-Track Chair: Dr. Nasser Abouzakhar, University of Hertfordshire, UK  

ECCWS 2020 Mini Track call for papers on Big Data for Cybersecurity  

As a distributed environment for an open market, the Internet is a rich source of “big data” with unprecedent amount of data generated and unlimited number of interactions between systems and users. This is to provide services to different applications, interconnected infrastructure such as transport, healthcare, energy for smart cities etc. Big data is gaining momentum as billions of devices and connected systems will soon be adopting smart technologies and exchanging sensitive information. However, this would allow attackers to identify many vulnerable targets. Therefore, the sophistication of cyber security threats and attacks has grown. As malware incidents increase in volume and complexity, it’s becoming more difficult for traditional analytic tools to keep up. Therefore, traditional security solutions have come into question which means they will require robust and effective systems. The purpose of this Mini Track “Big Data for Cybersecurity” is to bring together researchers, practitioners and industrials interested on big data aspects related to cybersecurity operations. Recent advances in the fields of big data such as big data analytics and tools, malware analysis, detection and prevention are a key factor in the growth of cybersecurity services and operations.

This Mini Track is expected to attract academics and professionals and to stimulate interesting discussions about the latest development of solution models and techniques for big data and cybersecurity.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:

      • Big data analytics as a security mechanism
      • Big data for event/activity monitoring
      • Big data for intrusion/fraud detection and prevention
      • Big data tools for cybersecurity
      • Big data industry standards and regulations

Cyber Security and Privacy for the Internet of Things and other Emerging Technologies

Dr.Shahzad Ahmed Memon
Dr.Shahzad Ahmed Memon
Dr. Sangapu Venkata Appaji
Dr. Sangapu Venkata Appaji

Mini-Track Chair: Dr.Shahzad Ahmed Memon, University of Sindh, Pakistan & Dr. Sangapu Venkata Appaji, KKR and KSR Institute of Technology and Sciences, India  

ECCWS 2020 Mini Track call for papers on Cyber Security and Privacy for the Internet of Things and other Emerging Technologies  

The purpose of this track is to bring together experts including academics and industrialists working in the field of cyber security research with interests in emerging technologies such as educational technologies, Internet of Things, Artificial intelligence, Smart environments, Block Chain, 5G Services, Cloud Computing and Robotics. The systems based on these technologies are considered as critical infrastructures and have seemingly captured human dependence completely. These technologies have attracted investors, academia and researchers equally and are expected to have a drastic global impact on human life and economy. This mini track is expected to attract field experts, academics and researchers to present and discuss ongoing research, latest developments, possible solutions and future challenges of cyber security and privacy in emerging technologies.

Subjects of interest to this mini-track may include but are not limited to:

      • Cyber Laws, Policies, Cyber-attack predication, Risk Assessment and Impact Analysis In emerging technologies
      • Cyber security Strategies for networked Robotics and automation
      • Cloud Forensics Approaches to deal with cybercrimes
      • Awareness to deal with Cyber-attack and cyber warfare in fourth Generation Industry applications

Ethical, Social, and Legal Issues in Cyber Warfare and Cyber Security

Mini-Track Chair: Prof.Richard L. Wilson, Towson University in Towson, MD, USA  

ECCWS 2020 Mini Track call for papers on Ethical, Social, and Legal Issues in Cyber Warfare and Cyber Security  

As technologies continue to grow exponentially the Ethical, Social, and Legal aspects of Cyber Warfare and Cyber Security are in need of being continually re-examined. By examining the Ethical, Social and Legal principles that are currently employed to address issues of Cyber Warfare, Information Warfare, Media Warfare, and Cyber Security we can undertake the further project of attempting to determine what Ethical, Social and Legal principles should guide our thought about these subjects in the future. Recently a number of issues have also arisen involving online Terrorism and online extremism. Ethical, Social, and Legal analysis can provide a foundation for making policy decisions about some of the problems related to all of the above topics.

Topics of interest to this mini-track include, but are not limited to:

      • Ethical, Social, and Legal issues of:
      • Cyber Warfare
      • Information Warfare
      • Social Media Warfare
      • Ethical, Societal, and legal impacts of online extremism.
      • Ethical, Societal, and legal impacts of online terrorism.
      • Societal impacts of Cyber Warfare, Information Warfare, and Social Media Warfare.
      • Societal impact of online extremism.
      • Societal impact of Domestic Terrorism.