ECGBL Mini Tracks

The Mini Tracks for ECGBL

  • Measurement & Evaluation for Game-Based Learning
  • Dialogic Perspectives on Games and Learning
  • GBL Approaches to Train People with Intellectual Disabilities in Everyday Life Skills
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Measurement & Evaluation for Game-Based Learning

Mini Track Chair: Dr. Ronald Dyer, University of Sheffield, UK  

ECGBL 2021 Mini Track on Measurement & Evaluation for Game-Based Learning  

Games are now pervasive within the education sector, yet a challenge remains regarding both identification and measurement of their impact on individual and programmatic performance. While increased engagement and motivation are commons elements cited as it relates to games, the question remains as to how do we capture the relevant data (qualitative or quantitative) requisite for identification of return on investment/learning as performance indicators to support their validity within the curricula. Additionally, how can we use measurement to support sustainable integration into the learning ecosystem. This mini-track focuses on the examination and potential development of various measurement frameworks to support construction of appropriate models for measurement of game effectiveness.  

Five generic themes have been identified below to form the basis of potential approaches/model integration. These measurement methodologies aim to assess the benefits of games both empirically and as a value-added component across learning environment.  

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:  

  • Game assessment diagnostic instrument(s)
  • Game performance scorecards (E.g. Scoring Rubric)
  • Pre/Post Knowledge Assessment Measurement
  • Qualitative Reflection instruments
  • Summative vs. Formative measures for classroom assessment

Dialogic Perspectives on Games and Learning

Mini Track Chair: Thorkild Hanghøj, Aalborg University  

ECGBL 2021 Mini Track on Dialogic Perspectives on Games and Learning  

It is widely recognized that Dialogic relations between teachers and students as well as between students play a key role in order to support and achieve educational aims. At the same time, research on Game-Based Learning often focus on specific game affordances while neglecting the Dialogic interaction among the involved actors in specific learning environments – e.g. teachers, students and game resources. In spite of the crucial importance of dialogic aspects in GBL, there exist relatively limited research on how to describe and understand dialogue when using games for learning. Thus, the aim of this mini track is to generate academic discussion on different ways of studying and enhancing Dialogic learning through games.  

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:  

  • Theoretical frameworks for conceptualising dialogic perspectives on games and learning
  • Methodological approaches for studying or assessing Dialogic learning in and around games
  • Different pedagogical approaches to facilitating game-related dialogue in educational contexts
  • How different game elements and game design features may support (or constrain) Dialogic learning. Including both analogue and digital game formats.
  • How to design games or game environments, which enable different Dialogic perspectives among participants.
  • Empirical studies investigating teachers' use of digital games as contextual resources for Dialogic teaching.

GBL Approaches to Train People with Intellectual Disabilities in Everyday Life Skills

Mini Track Chair: Olga Shabalina, Volgograd State technical University, Russia

ECGBL 2021 Mini Track on GBL Approaches to Train People with Intellectual Disabilities in Everyday Life Skills  

Intellectual Disability is characterized by significant limitations both in intellectual functioning and in adaptive behavior, which covers a range of everyday social and practical skills. The game-based approach is considered to be one of the most attractive and motivating ways for training practical skills for both children and adults. However, the games for people with intellectual disabilities (PID) should meet some special requirements to ensure accessibility and easiness of use. 

Development of games for training everyday life skills for PID demands should answer the following questions: 

    • how to immerse real-life activities in the game context?
    • how to make the game understandable and adaptable for PID?

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:  

  • Game-based modeling of everyday life activities of PID
  • Assistive and accessible technologies for games for PID
  • User Interface (UI) design for games for PID
  • Adaptation techniques for games for PID
  • Case studies describing best (and worst) practices.

This mini track encourages discussion on these topics and aims to attract people interested to share their experiences in the development of games for training everyday life skills for PID.