ECIAIR Mini Tracks

The Mini Tracks at ECIAIR

      • Malicious Use of Artificial Intelligence: New Challenges for Democratic Institutions and Political Stability
      • AI Ethics, from Design to Certification
      • Human Centred Futures; human factors for industry 4.0
      • “We need to talk about AI regulation”
      • AI and Robotics in Healthcare: Progresses, Opportunities and Challenges
      • Artificial Intelligence in the Emergent Economy and Their Impact on People, Organization, and Society

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Malicious Use of Artificial Intelligence: New Challenges for Democratic Institutions and Political Stability

Mini Track Chair: Prof. Evgeny N. Pashentsev, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia  

ECIAIR 2021 Mini Track on the Malicious Use of Artificial Intelligence: New Challenges for Democratic Institutions and Political Stability  

The possibilities for artificial intelligence (AI) are growing at an unprecedented rate. AI has many areas of social utility: from machine translation and medical diagnostics to electronic trading and education. Less investigated are the areas and types of the malicious use of artificial intelligence (MUAI), which should be given further attention. It is impossible to exclude global, disastrous, rapid and latent consequences of MUAI. MUAI implies the possibility of using multiple weaknesses of individual and human civilization as a whole. For instance, AI could integrate with a nuclear or biological attack, and even improve its effectiveness. However, AI could similarly be used as a most efficient defence instrument. The international experience in monitoring online content and predictive analytics indicates the possibility of creating an AI system, based on the information disseminated in the digital environment, that could not only indicate threats to information and psychological security in a timely manner but also offer scenarios of counteraction (including counteracting offensive weapons’ systems).  

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:

  • Dynamic social and political systems and the malicious use of AI
  • AI in civil and military conflicts
  • AI enhancing terrorist threats and counter-terrorist response
  • Role and practice of the malicious use of AI in contemporary geopolitical confrontation
  • Predictive analytics and prognostic weapons
  • Risk scenarios of the malicious use of AI
  • Spoofing, data extraction, and poisoning of training data to exploit vulnerabilities under the malicious use of AI
  • Artificial Intelligence Online Reputation Management (ORM)
  • AI in Lethal Autonomous Systems (LAWs):
  • Deepfakes and their possible influence on political warfare
  • Amplification and political agenda setting
  • Emotional AI in political warfare
  • Damage reputation through bot activities
  • Challenges of the malicious use of AI
  • Ways and means to neutralize targeted information and psychological destabilization of democratic institutions using AI.

AI Ethics, from Design to Certification

Mini Track Chair:  Prof A G Hessami, Vega Systems-UK  

ECIAIR 2021 Mini Track on AI Ethics, from Design to Certification  

With the rapid advancement and application of Autonomous Decision Making and Algorithmic Learning Systems often referred to as AI, the consideration of societal values impacted by such artefacts should be underpinned by guidelines, standards and independent certification to engender trust by all stakeholders. This track covers all aspects of exploration, consultation, articulation of ethical requirements, risk based design, deployment, monitoring and decommissioning for a whole life cycle ethical assurance of AI systems.  

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:  

  • Value Based/Sensitive Design
  • Consideration of Ethics in Autonomous Decision Making
  • Facets of Technology Ethics
  • Independent Verification of Conformity to Ethics
  • Emerging AI Ethics Guidelines, Standards and Certification Criteria

Human Centred Futures; human factors for industry 4.0

Mini Track Chair: Prof Karen Cham, University of Brighton, UK

ECIAIR 2021 Mini Track on Human Centred Futures; human factors for industry 4.0  

“Human Centred Futures” is a proposed open call track for full academic and /or position papers, case studies and/or demos with regards all forms of human factors in the social application of robotics and AI for Industry 4.0  

This would be including but not limited to, human/machine teaming, novel AI, neural networks, cognitive systems, psychology, ergonomics, human performance measures, sentiment analysis, behavioural analytics, conversion metrics and mitigating bias in VUCA scenarios enabled or accelerated by 5G, 6G and future networks.  Verticals include:  

  • digital health, care and wellbeing
  • agri-metrics and geo-data economies
  • serious games, virtualised and simulated training
  • next gen retail, arts and entertainment
  • re-manufacturing and circular economies
  • enterprise and behavioural change applications etc

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:  

  • untethered / remote XR applications
  • intelligent DX and psychometrics
  • EV & HITL systems
  • IoT & IoP in smart homes, smart cities, smart planet
  • quantified self Internet of Value (IoV) and Internet of Mind (IoM)

“We need to talk about AI regulation”

Mini Track Chair: Marija Cubric, University of Hertfordshire, UK

ECIAIR 2021 Mini Track on “We need to talk about AI regulation”  

The great Stephen Hawking once said the emergence of AI could be the "worst event in the history of our civilization” and he urged AI developers to "employ best practice" to control its development. While the general artificial super intelligence is still a distant prospect, even in the context of the narrow AI, where most of the current AI development is based, AI has a potential to harm humans either physically, as is the example of autonomous weapons, or psychologically by influencing, controlling and manipulating human agency through fake news, and more generally, at the societal level, by  for example, introducing bias in decision processes.  

If we accept the premise that AI has elements with destructive potential for the human race, then we should start thinking about regulatory framework for its development and deployment. Some work in this area is starting to emerge from various directions, such as the EU proposal for legal framework for AI, “Spiegelhalter’s tests for trustworthy algorithms, Suresh and Guttag’s framework for understanding unintended consequences of machine learning and a few other conceptual frameworks offering AI ethics guidelines. Still, many remain unconvinced that regulated AI is the way forward, and worry that regulation may stifle the innovation, and create uneven playing field based on the ownership of regulations.  

For this mini-track we invite papers which provide diverse perspectives on AI regulations based on research and lessons-learned from practice.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:  

  • new conceptual models for AI regulation
  • systematic reviews of current research on AI regulation
  • case-studies based on existing AI R&D projects focusing on AI regulation
  • stakeholders’ views, opinions, and critical perspectives on the existing initiatives on AI regulations
  • comparative studies perspectives (e.g. EU, NA, China) on AI regulations

AI and Robotics in Healthcare: Progresses, Opportunities and Challenges

Mini Track Chair: Dr Mitt Nowshade Kabir, “Trouvus”, AI consulting and development company, Toronto, Canada  

ECIAIR 2021 Mini Track on AI and Robotics in Healthcare: Progresses, Opportunities and Challenges  

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is bringing dramatic changes in every industry by propelling innovation and improving productivity. One of the key sectors where AI and Robotics' impact has already become substantial and promising more disruptive changes is Healthcare. Both AI and Robotics are steadily becoming more sophisticated in gaining human-level capabilities in many areas of Healthcare at lower costs. These new abilities have a ripple effect that is reverberating across the entire healthcare system. For example, AI has turned into an indispensable tool in the process of drug discovery. Recently, AI systems have made tremendous progress in finding a way to determine the 3D shapes of proteins. The solution to the protein folding problem helps to better understand the building blocks of cells and significantly expedite the drug discovery process.

Another example is AI's applications in clinical diagnostics. In many areas, such as lung and breast cancer detection, AI programs perform better than their human counterparts. From process automation to robotic surgery and early disease detection to novel treatment methods, the healthcare sector's future holds enormous potential. 

However, there also exist many challenges.

Numerous questions remain unresolved. Who is responsible when an AI makes an error causing injuries or death? How to eliminate biases from systems that may have a detrimental effect on a disadvantaged group. How to handle privacy concerns when more and more data are becoming accessible to AI systems?  There also exist human capital related challenges.  

AI became a critical tool for the healthcare system only recently. Thanks to AI's exponential growth, demand for data scientists and AI experts are also increasing. The lack of talented data scientists is slowing down the deployment of AI in crucial areas. On the other hand, the aggressive implementation of AI in the healthcare sector will eventually displace many health workers from their jobs. This problem is not that severe yet but might become acute if governments and industries don't take immediate action.

This mini-track explores changes that AI and Robotics bring to Healthcare, how AI and Robotics impact social and personal life, and what the future looks like for this critical for humanity area.

We will accept papers that reflect the followings or cover related areas:

  • Philosophical and ethical issues related to AI and robotics in the Healthcare
  • Future opportunities and problems in the use of AI and Robotics in Healthcare
  • AI in Biotechnology
  • Human-machine interaction (HMI) and its impact on Healthcare
  • AI-based digital transformation strategic approaches in Healthcare

Artificial Intelligence in the Emergent Economy and Their Impact on People, Organization, and Society

Mini Track Chair: Elena Serova, HSE University, St. Petersburg Branch, Russia  

ECIAIR 2021 Mini Track on Artificial Intelligence in the Emergent Economy and Their Impact on People, Organization, and Society  

Today, a key component in improving organizational performance and increasing competitiveness can be seen as utilising the latest advancements in the field of intelligent information systems and technologies, including contemporary systems of artificial intelligence (AI). AI systems and technologies can govern the ability of companies to generate sustainable business models in a global environment. When solving business problems, AI and intelligent technologies can ensure mutual understanding at all organizational levels and bridge the gap between strategic vision and its implementation. In emerging markets, artificial intelligence and intelligent technologies are in fact an integral part of cutting-edge management systems. They add to the globalization of business by providing quick access to employees, customers, and partners worldwide, as well as coordinating global interaction between companies at different stages of the value chain. It does not mean that intelligent technologies and systems simply increase the efficiency of a company’s operations; they can be considered as key intangible assets. But it is obvious, that there are some significant constraints in the domains of successfully using artificial intelligence.  

This mini-track provides evidence of the importance of AI and considers the main domains of AI implementation as well as ethical and technological challenges.   Both theoretical and empirical contributions are welcomed. 

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:  

  • Emerging Market Multinational Enterprises (EMNEs) AI Strategies
  • Technological challenges and Ethical considerations in the use of AI. Societal impacts
  • The impact of AI on managers and organizations: advantages and constraints
  • Core AI Applications for Business Solutions (deep machine learning, reinforcement learning, computer vision, natural language processing, speech recognition and synthesis, intelligent support for decision-making)
  • Predictive Analytics and Intelligent Data Analysis for Decision Making